BPC-157 Review | Miracle Peptide or Waste of Cash?

bpc-157 review

Are you looking for a BPC-157 review free of biased opinions and unsubstantiated fluff?

If so, you have come to the right place.

 

BPC-157 has been used experimentally by research subjects for the past decade to heal everyday pains and chronic injuries.


Athletes need to recover faster so they can perform and compete at elite levels. Bodybuilders need a safe “go-to” option when they want to recover from tissue damage and continue making gains. Weekend warriors are in search for a therapeutic option which doesn’t involve expensive medications or complicated surgeries.


Have these individuals stumbled upon a miracle peptide for accelerated healing and recovery?


Or are they falling victim to the common “placebo effect”?


This review will talk about the supposed research-proven health benefits of BPC-157, the side effects of BPC-157 you may encounter, the optimal BPC-157 dosage, and much more.


In order to understand whether BPC-157 is worth your hard-earned money or not, let’s first examine how it is suspected to work in the human body.

Buy BPC-157 from the #1 online Peptides vendor in the world: Peptides Sciences

Buy BPC-157 from the #1 online Peptides vendor in the world: Peptides Sciences

P.S: This is not medical or legal advice. This is strictly for entertainment purposes. We are not doctors – nor lawyers. All information below is presented for use on “test subjects” only. Not for human consumption. Please read my disclaimer.

What is BPC-157?

BPC-157 is a pentadecapeptide (a sequence of 15 amino acids) whose sequence is derived partially from a peptide which naturally exists in the body and gets secreted by the gut.

 

This makes BPC-157 a synthetic peptide, as its sequence does not occur in peptides derived from natural sources. It’s much easier to use the abbreviated version in discussing the peptide as BPC is short for “Body Protection Compound.”

 

The synthetic version is used by biohackers instead of the naturally occurring BPC for a good reason [1]:

 

“The synthetic version of BPC was developed because the naturally occurring BPC, when administered by injection of an aqueous solution or in normal saline, causes pain and/or necrosis.


The synthetic version of the peptide does not have these issues, has improved stability in normal saline, and retains the body protective properties of BPC. Unlike most other peptides, which are effective only when injected, BPC-157 is orally bio-available.”


BPC-157 is widely regarded as a “recovery accelerator” for its ability to heal wounds, organs and tissues all over the body.

According to a presentation recently given at a well-respected medical seminar, here’s a quick summary of the supposed health benefits of BPC-157 [2]:

  • Significant anti-inflammatory activity

  • Repairs the muscle, tendon, bone, teeth and brain

  • Leads to the formation of new blood vessels, thereby improving blood flow

  • Increases expression of human growth hormone

  • Can undo the damage brought about by using corticosteroids

It’s worth noting that all of these benefits have been exclusively found in animal studies and experiments involving cell cultures.

But of the few Phase I and Phase II clinical trials currently underway in Croatia, BPC-157 appears to be well-tolerated and effective [3]:

“With strong antiulcer activity, BPC 157 remains one of the promising agents in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease (PL-10, PLD-116, PL14736, Pliva, Croatia) (no toxic or side effects reported) and wound-healing therapy”

Even more interesting is how BPC-157 does not require a “carrier” molecule to ensure it gets absorbed into the body and exerts its protective effects [4].

But what have actual biohackers found when they experimented with BPC-157 for themselves?

BPC-157

Does BPC-157 Actually Work?

Therapeutic peptides like BPC-157 have taken the underground fitness industry by storm.

For instance, world-famous biohacker Ben Greenfield promoted BPC-157 as a way to “heal the body like Wolverine” in a glowing review published on his site [5]:

“I initially began to use BPC-157 for golfer’s elbow (inner elbow pain also known as “climber’s elbow” or “medial epicondylitis)…settled upon a self-administered subcutaneous BPC-157 injection of 250mcg in my left elbow on one day, then 250mcg in my right elbow the next day, for a total of two weeks.

At this point, my elbow pain had completely disappeared, so I stopped.”

But Ben is not the only experimental “drug” user who noticed the same healing effects with BPC-157.

 

On the Mixed Martial Arts forums, one user remarked on how quickly BPC-157 helped him with a painful joint arthritis injury [6]:

“I’ve been using it off and on for the past several months for an L5-S1 bulging disc and facet joint arthritis. It absolutely works and does so within a few days.

My injury is severe and long-term so I didn’t expect an immediate fix. I’m also doing treatments on numerous fronts (PT, stretches, cold water immersion, exosome injections).”

Reddit also has a popular peptides community online, where one user found it equally effective for numerous injuries on different parts of his body [7]:

“I’ve been taking it for 10 days now and I’ve been blown away with the effectiveness. My shoulder is feeling significantly better and I noticed improvements in range of motion 3 days in.

At 10 days now the impingment on my nerve is almost gone and the pain which used to radiate down my arm is now minor and localized. An old hamstring injury that I had accepted wasn’t going to get better a year ago has seen improvement as well. Stability and power in my squats and lunges has increased.”

However, this is as far as it goes when it comes to anecdotal data supporting the use of BPC-157.

You won’t see people promoting for purposes such as muscle growth or restoring hair loss, and that’s because BPC-157 cannot directly lead to those outcomes.


Many of these users – with the exception of Ben – are anonymous, simply because peptides are still in a “grey” area when it comes to legality.


Furthermore, it is difficult to quantify “before and after” results of an injury with pictures.


It would require an assessment of how an individual feels about their pain, combined with visually observing their range of moment.


Let’s take a break from anecdotal reports and examine what the scientific literature says about the purported benefits of BPC-157.

BPC-157 Benefits and Uses

If you search up “BPC 157” on PubMed, you’re going to find 131 studies published about this peptide from 1992 until 2020, as of this writing.

And indeed, BPC-157 has shown great promise in regenerating a wide variety of bodily tissues.

But let’s zoom in and focus on the top 5 benefits of BPC-157 examined by researchers and scientists…

BPC-157 Shows Potential In Repairing Ligaments, Muscle Tissue, and Skin Wounds

In a 2010 rat study where the ligament was cut up, BPC-157 was able to consistently heal the injured body part from a functional and biomechanical standpoint [8]:

“…the BPC 157 ligament healing may be clinically relevant (i.e., no knee joint contracture, no obvious valgus instability, preserved muscle motor function and walking pattern)”

This healing effect was also observed in a 2019 review, in which multiple studies were examined to assess BPC-157’s ability to repair soft tissues injuries that were either traumatic or systemic [9]:

“…all of the studies to date that have tested BPC 157 as a treatment therapy have demonstrated extremely positive healing effects for various injury types in a number of soft tissues.”

The researchers were correct in noting that this effect has not been verifiably proven in humans who have also undergone ligament surgeries.

And in case you were wondering, BPC-157’s therapeutic effect was observed in skin wounds as early as 1997 [10].

BPC-157 Uniformly Enhances Blood Flow

One of the major issues involving injured tissues is the lack of blood flow.

Blood flow is essential for supplying the necessary oxygen and nutrients required for an individual to fully recover from their injury.

There are two mechanisms by which BPC-157 is believed to improve blood flow, especially towards damaged tissues.


The first mechanism involves increasing the expression of growth factor early growth response gene-1 (EGF-1), which has been shown to elevate blood flow towards wounds [11, 12].


The second mechanism involves activating vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 2 (VEGFR2), which is necessary for repairing and increasing the production of blood vessels [13].


While these results come exclusively from in vitro studies in cells, it definitely explains why BPC-157 can accelerate the rate of recovery.

BPC-157 May Be Protective Against Harmful Effects Of Other Drugs

Very few people know this, but BPC-157 has been demonstrated to undo the damage done by the side effects of certain drugs in experimental studies.

One of such drugs is haloperidol, which is commonly used to treat mental disorders such as mania and schizophrenia.


An unfortunate side effect of haloperidol is inducing stomach lesions, in which the stomach tissue grows in a way that may potentially be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).


BPC-157 administration significantly reduced the size of the lesions when administered to mice who had stomach lesions as a result of taking haloperidol [14].


The same effect was observed when rats were given the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide, another medication where stomach lesions are a potential side effect [15].

BPC-157 Has Anti-Inflammatory Properties

A 2012 review published on the use of BPC-157 in ulcerative colitis (a form of inflammatory bowel disease) commented on BPC-157’s anti-inflammatory effects when used to treat ulcer problems [16].

Interestingly, the researchers noted how BPC-157 was free of the common side effects seen in the medications that are commonly prescribed as anti-inflammatory drugs.

In the review quoted, it appears as if BPC-157 is equally useful for treating both acute and chronic inflammation.

BPC-157 Is Neuroprotective Against Brain Disorders

Believe it or not, preliminary studies have even discovered that BPC-157 can be useful for treating injuries sustained to the brain [17].

This includes reversing the progress of traumatic brain injury, restoring cognitive function, and regenerating nerves.

Some scientists have even come to discover that BPC-157 can be useful in treating behavioral problems:

“BPC 157 modulates serotonergic and dopaminergic systems, beneficially affects various behavioral disturbances that otherwise appeared due to specifically (over)stimulated/damaged neurotransmitters systems”

While it’s too early to make any definitive conclusions, this is a rather promising observation.

BPC-157

BPC-157 Side Effects

Are there any BPC-157 side effects you should be concerned about?

As mentioned earlier, none of the human clinical trials done to date have observed any notable side effects or toxicities at any dose of BPC-157.

And according to the positive testimonials I’ve received from my research subjects, you don’t have anything to worry about.

Of course, this doesn’t mean you can willfully take the highest BPC-157 dosage and act carelessly when using the peptide.

But if you are using BPC-157 responsibly, there is no reason to suspect you will experience any adverse side effects.

The only time you may feel some discomfort is if you are using BPC-157 for the first time, or taking higher doses of BPC-157 than normal.

Nausea, headache, slight fatigue and redness in the site of injection are the only commonly reported side effects of “test subjects”. However, it’s worth noting they disappear as your body gradually gets used to BPC-157.

And for those of you worried about any possible connection between BPC-157, just know there is no sufficient proof backing the claim.

There are only 3 studies published discussing the link, one of them suggesting it aggravates cancer and two of them saying it does the polar opposite.

However, if you are still worried about this possibility, speak to your physician before using BPC-157.

BPC-157 Dosage Guide

What is the optimal BPC-157 dosage for recovering as fast as possible?

It truly depends, as everybody is biochemically unique and different from one another. Since BPC-157 is not a commonly prescribed medication, there is no universal standard for dosing BPC-157.

The most commonly recommended dosage protocol for BPC-157 is 125-250 mcg taken twice a day: Once in the morning on an empty stomach, and again before bed.

NOTE: “Mcg” stands for “micrograms”. DO NOT take these dosages at the milligram level!

While you will hear some stories on internet forums of people taking a total daily dose of 1 mg, this is extreme and certainly not advised for anybody who is new to taking BPC-157.

 

After using BPC-157 for 4-12 weeks, make sure you take a 2-4 week “break” before you resume using BPC-157.

 

Alternatively, you can stop using BPC-157 once your injury is fully healed.

 

There is generally no need for a “loading” protocol, which involves taking a higher dose of BPC-157 for a short period of time before returning to a lower dose that can be maintained.

 

Here are some helpful tips to maximize your use of BPC-157:

  • Make sure you have all the necessary equipment to make the injection – bacteriostatic water, sterile needles, syringes, rubbing alcohol, and so on.

  • Use a reputable peptide calculator to make sure you are injecting the correct amount of BPC-157 into your body [18].

  • After reconstituting the BPC-157, ensure you are storing the final solution in a refrigerator [19].

Long story short: Use common sense and you’ll be just fine when taking your very first BPC-157 dose!

BPC-157 Dosage Guide

So where is the best place to buy BPC-157?

I do not recommend the traditional route of getting a doctor’s prescription, as the process is both time-consuming and expensive.

The best way to buy BPC-157 is to use a reputable online vendor who sells the highest-quality peptides available without breaking your bank account.


No matter your experience with peptides, there is no other place you should buy them from except for Peptide Sciences.


Peptide Sciences has been around for several years, earning the trust of biohackers through world-class customer service and relentless dedication to testing their own products.


There are several independent third-party reviews of this vendor online, and the overwhelming majority have nothing but good things to say about them [20]:

“To cut a long story short, I ordered from Peptide Sciences and I first found their helpline to be extremely efficient. I bought some BPC to start and the quality was first class and the best I had found.

The price was not the cheapest however I soon found that the quality I received made the price well worth every penny. For anyone wanting to buy peptides, I say go try Peptide Sciences, you’ll never look back.”

This review is awesome, but it doesn’t fully describe why Peptide Sciences is the #1 online vendor for buying BPC-157 online:
  • Exceptional Customer Service: With speedy yet helpful replies and multiple ways to contact them, what’s not to love about people who truly care for their customers?

  • Payment Options: You have the option of paying by electronic cheque or credit card. But several cryptocurrency options are available, along with 3rd-party platforms like Venmo and Apple/Google Pay.

  • Peptides Exceeding 99% Purity: Peptide Sciences uses high-performance liquid chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to verify the potency, purity and identity of each peptide.

  • Awesome Shipping Rates: You pay a flat $15 fee for any order, but shipping is waived when your orders exceeds $200. Orders ship within 24 hours, arriving in 2-3 business days to the USA and 7-10 business days to international countries.

  • 100% USA-Made: Peptide Sciences thrives in a country with the strictest manufacturing and quality control regulations. And since their products are used for clinical trials and research studies, they have no choice but to be the best.

  • TFA-Free All peptides created and sold by Peptide Sciences are 100% TFA-free! Trifluoroacetic acid is found in many of the peptides from low quality vendors who import from China. While not getting to deep into the science here, TFA can be exceptionally dangerous.

Don’t worry if any of this intimidates you – Peptide Sciences charges very fair prices and provides you with informational articles about peptides to learn more about the subject.


All in all, Peptide Sciences is without a doubt the best place to buy BPC-157 online – or any peptide, for that matter!

How to Order BPC-157 in Your Country

To my knowledge, there should not be any difficulty with ordering peptides online and having them delivered to your home.

It is unlikely for customs to seize your order and refuse to ship it to address. In the very rare case this happens, Peptide Sciences will provide you with a full refund or re-ship your order at no cost to you. As long as you do not sell your peptides to other people or use them in any illegal fashion, you should be good to go.


The only way you will not be able to order BPC-157 in your country is if your chosen vendor does not offer shipping to your country.


So if you go to the checkout cart while buying BPC-157 online and you cannot find your country, there’s not much you can do.


Short of calling the vendor and politely asking them if there are any alternate routes you can take to getting BPC-157 delivered to your house.

BPC-157

BPC-157 vs. TB-500

So what is the difference between BPC-157 and TB-500, exactly? Can the two peptides be used simultaneously to further accelerate the healing process, or do they have completely separate functions in the human body?

 

First, let’s briefly talk about what TB-500 is and what it can do for you.

 

TB-500 is the synthetic version of the naturally occurring peptide Thymosin Beta-4, which is produced by the thymus and found in virtually every cell in your body.

 

Here’s a short summary of how this peptide works [21]:

“Thymosin-beta-4 (Tb4) which is mostly produced in the white blood cell, is a small, natural peptide and it was demonstrated that high level of Tb4 is present to act in the injured area during the repair process. Due to its small size, Tb4 can readily diffuse into tissues, triggers angiogenesis, and controls the inflammation cascade.”

Unlike BPC-157, TB-500 has been more extensively studied in the scientific literature.

A quick PubMed search of TB-500 reveals 860 studies published between 1981 and 2020, as of this writing. There are only two real differences between the two peptides, despite working through different mechanisms:

  • BPC-157 is believed to work locally and is better suited for lowering inflammation

  • TB-500 works systematically across the body and is slightly better for healing muscle injuries

But these differences are minor, as both peptides can work in combination and end up being superior to taking either peptide alone.

If you are going to use TB-500 and BPC-157 at the same time, use the following dosage protocol:

  • BPC-157: 250 mcg taken twice a day, as previously described

  • TB-500: Take 2-4 mg twice a week in evenly spaced doses (i.e. Monday and Thursday)

Additionally, use a mixed peptide blend to save yourself wasted time in trying to create two separate reconstituted solutions.

BPC-157 Review | Verdict

If there is anything you should take away from this BPC-157 review, it’s this:

BPC-157 would be a very valuable addition to anybody’s supplement stack if they want to heal any kind of bodily injury.


The side effects are so rare as to be non-existent, the healing starts fairly quickly and you’ll be back in the gym much faster.


Now granted, BPC-157 is not an overnight miracle cure. You still need to exercise correctly, eat right and get plenty of sleep at night. It is highly recommended that you allow your injury to reach full recovery before any physical activity is resumed.


But BPC-157 is definitely a miracle peptide and not a waste of cash!

Buy BPC-157 from our #1 recommended vendor...

References

  1. BPC-157. Retrieved March 23, 2020. Practicalpeptides.com

  2. BPC-157. Retrieved March 23, 2020. Paulinamedicalclinic.com

  3. Vuksic T, Zoricic I, Brcic L, Sever M, Klicek R, et al. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in trials for inflammatory bowel disease (PL-10, PLD-116, PL14736, Pliva, Croatia) heals ileoileal anastomosis in the rat. Surg Today. 2007;37(9):768-77.

  4. Sikiric P, Seiwerth S, Rucman R, Torkovic B, Rokotov DS, et al. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: novel therapy in gastrointestinal tract. Curr Pharm Des. 2011;17(16):1612-1632.

  5. How To Use BPC-157: A Complete Dummies Guide To Healing The Body Like Wolverine. Retrieved March 20, 2020. Bengreenfieldfitness.com

  6. BPC 157 Peptide. Retrieved March 21, 2020. Mixedmartialarts.com

  7. BPC 157 is living up to the hype. Retrieved March 22, 2020. Reddit.com

  8. Cerovecki T, Bojanic I, Brcic L, Radic B, Vukoja I, et al. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) improves ligament healing in the rat. J Orthop Res. 2010;28(9):1155-1161. doi:10.1002/jor.21107.

  9. Gwyer D, Wragg NM, Wilson SL. Gastric pentadecapeptide body protection compound BPC 157 and its role in accelerating musculoskeletal soft tissue healing. Cell Tissue Res. 2019;377(2):153-159. doi:10.1007/s00441-019-03016-8.

  10. Seiwerth S, Sikiric P, Grabarevic Z, Zoricic I, Hanzevacki M, et al. BPC 157’s effect on healing. J Physiol Paris. 1997;91(3-5):173-178.

  11. Tkalcevic VI, Cuzic S, Brajsa K, Mildner B, Bokulic A, et al. Enhancement by PL 14736 of granulation and collagen organization in healing wounds and the potential role of egr-1 expression. Eur J Pharmacol. 2007;570(1-3):212-221.

  12. Laato M. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on blood flow and albumin extravasation in experimental granulation tissue. Acta Chir Scand. 1986;152:401-405.

  13. Hseih MJ, Liu HT, Wang CN, Huang HY, Lin Y, et al. Therapeutic potential of pro-angiogenic BPC157 is associated with VEGFR2 activation and up-regulation. J Mol Med (Berl). 2017;95(3):323-333. doi:10.1007/s00109-016-1488-y

  14. Bilic I, Zoricic I, Anic T, Separovic J, Stancic-Rokotov D, et al. Haloperidol-stomach lesions attenuation by pentadecapeptide BPC 157, omeprazole, bromocriptine, but not atropine, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine and misoprostol in mice. Life Sci. 2001;68(16):1905-1912.

  15. Luetic K, Sucic M, Vlainic J, Halle ZB, Strinic D, et al. Cyclophosphamide induced stomach and duodenal lesions as a NO-system disturbance in rats: L-NAME, L-arginine, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Inflammopharmacology. 2017;223(2):255-264. doi:10.1007/s10787-017-0330-7.

  16. Sikiric P, Seiwerth S, Rucman R, Turkovic B, Rokotov DS, et al. Focus on ulcerative colitis: stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Curr Med Chem. 2012;19(1):126-132.

  17. Sikiric P, Seiwerth S, Rucman R, et al. Brain-gut Axis and Pentadecapeptide BPC 157: Theoretical and Practical Implications. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2016;14(8):857–865. doi:10.2174/1570159×13666160502153022.

  18. Peptide Mixing and Dosing Calculator. Retrieved March 20, 2020. http://112.196.20.91/realpeptide/peptide-calculator/

  19. Healing with BPC-157. Retrieved March 23, 2020. http://112.196.20.91/forum/

  20. PeptideSciences Reviews. Retrieved March 24, 2020. Trustpilot.com

  21. Aksu U, Yaman OM, Guner I, Guntas G, Sonmez F, et al. The Protective Effects of Thymosin-β-4 in a Rat Model of Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury. J Invest Surg. 2019, 1-9. doi:10.1080/08941939.2019.1672841

References

  1. BPC-157. Retrieved March 23, 2020. Practicalpeptides.com

     

  2. BPC-157. Retrieved March 23, 2020. Paulinamedicalclinic.com

     

  3. Vuksic T, Zoricic I, Brcic L, Sever M, Klicek R, et al. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in trials for inflammatory bowel disease (PL-10, PLD-116, PL14736, Pliva, Croatia) heals ileoileal anastomosis in the rat. Surg Today. 2007;37(9):768-77.

     

  4. Sikiric P, Seiwerth S, Rucman R, Torkovic B, Rokotov DS, et al. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: novel therapy in gastrointestinal tract. Curr Pharm Des. 2011;17(16):1612-1632.

     

  5. How To Use BPC-157: A Complete Dummies Guide To Healing The Body Like Wolverine. Retrieved March 20, 2020. Bengreenfieldfitness.com

     

  6. BPC 157 Peptide. Retrieved March 21, 2020. Mixedmartialarts.com

     

  7. BPC 157 is living up to the hype. Retrieved March 22, 2020. Reddit.com

     

  8. Cerovecki T, Bojanic I, Brcic L, Radic B, Vukoja I, et al. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) improves ligament healing in the rat. J Orthop Res. 2010;28(9):1155-1161. doi:10.1002/jor.21107.

     

  9. Gwyer D, Wragg NM, Wilson SL. Gastric pentadecapeptide body protection compound BPC 157 and its role in accelerating musculoskeletal soft tissue healing. Cell Tissue Res. 2019;377(2):153-159. doi:10.1007/s00441-019-03016-8.

     

  10. Seiwerth S, Sikiric P, Grabarevic Z, Zoricic I, Hanzevacki M, et al. BPC 157’s effect on healing. J Physiol Paris. 1997;91(3-5):173-178.

     

  11. Tkalcevic VI, Cuzic S, Brajsa K, Mildner B, Bokulic A, et al. Enhancement by PL 14736 of granulation and collagen organization in healing wounds and the potential role of egr-1 expression. Eur J Pharmacol. 2007;570(1-3):212-221.

     

  12. Laato M. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on blood flow and albumin extravasation in experimental granulation tissue. Acta Chir Scand. 1986;152:401-405.

     

  13. Hseih MJ, Liu HT, Wang CN, Huang HY, Lin Y, et al. Therapeutic potential of pro-angiogenic BPC157 is associated with VEGFR2 activation and up-regulation. J Mol Med (Berl). 2017;95(3):323-333. doi:10.1007/s00109-016-1488-y

     

  14. Bilic I, Zoricic I, Anic T, Separovic J, Stancic-Rokotov D, et al. Haloperidol-stomach lesions attenuation by pentadecapeptide BPC 157, omeprazole, bromocriptine, but not atropine, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine and misoprostol in mice. Life Sci. 2001;68(16):1905-1912.

     

  15. Luetic K, Sucic M, Vlainic J, Halle ZB, Strinic D, et al. Cyclophosphamide induced stomach and duodenal lesions as a NO-system disturbance in rats: L-NAME, L-arginine, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Inflammopharmacology. 2017;223(2):255-264. doi:10.1007/s10787-017-0330-7.

     

  16. Sikiric P, Seiwerth S, Rucman R, Turkovic B, Rokotov DS, et al. Focus on ulcerative colitis: stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Curr Med Chem. 2012;19(1):126-132.

     

  17. Sikiric P, Seiwerth S, Rucman R, et al. Brain-gut Axis and Pentadecapeptide BPC 157: Theoretical and Practical Implications. Curr Neuropharmacol. 2016;14(8):857–865. doi:10.2174/1570159×1
    3666160502153022.

     

  18. Peptide Mixing and Dosing Calculator. Retrieved March 20, 2020. http://112.196.20.91/rea
    lpeptide/peptide-calculator/

     

  19. Healing with BPC-157. Retrieved March 23, 2020. http://112.196.20.91/fo
    rum/

     

  20. PeptideSciences Reviews. Retrieved March 24, 2020. Trustpilot.com

     

  21. Aksu U, Yaman OM, Guner I, Guntas G, Sonmez F, et al. The Protective Effects of Thymosin-β-4 in a Rat Model of Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury. J Invest Surg. 2019, 1-9. doi:10.1080/08941939.2
    019.1672841

Table of Contents

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