GHK-Cu For Bodybuilding | Miracle Peptide or Scam?

gku-cu bodybuilding

Curious about GHK-Cu for bodybuilding​?

​Then you’ve come to the perfect place. While other peptides have proven incredibly effected for packing on muscle mass, GHK-Cu has recently come into the spotlight.


Why? Because certain users have reported interesting benefits, like:

  • Muscle soreness for less time after intense workouts

  • More energy

  • Quicker gains

  • Healthier skin

  • Thicker hair and better hair growth

​But there’s a little bit more to it than that…

GHK-Cu has very well-established benefits for tissue regeneration and healing, but is it also a potent muscle-building substance? Is this copper peptide a miracle or a scam?

We’ll cover all that in this article, including a brief description of what GHK-Cu is, what it can do, some of the evidence for its effectiveness, and how to judge your dose for using GHK-Cu as a bodybuilding supplement.

Buy GHK-Cu from the #1 online Peptides vendor in the world: Peptides Sciences

Buy GHK-Cu from the #1 online Peptides vendor in the world: Peptides Sciences

P.S: This is not medical or legal advice. This is strictly for entertainment purposes. We are not doctors – nor lawyers. All information below is presented for use on “test subjects” only. Not for human consumption. Please read my disclaimer.

What is GHK-Cu?

​GHK is a peptide, which is a chain of amino acids that is not quite as long as a protein. It is naturally made in your body and consists of three amino acids: Glycine, Histidine, and Lysine [1]. When this peptide bonds with a molecule of copper, it becomes GHK-Cu peptide.

GHK-Cu is basically responsible for keeping your DNA healthy and activating the genes that repair tissue. At the same time, it turns off the genes that are responsible for inflammation and breaking down tissue [1]. The more GHK-Cu you have in your body, the faster your body can respond when things get damaged or torn.

It was first discovered in the 1970s by Loren Pickart and his colleagues [2]. They noticed that liver tissue from older adults began to behave and repair itself like younger adults when it was placed in blood from younger adults. In other words, the blood of younger people seemed to revive the liver.

They have since found out that this result was mainly caused by GHK-Cu, also known as copper peptide. While GHK-Cu peptide is plentiful in your body when you’re young, it declines substantially as you get older [3]. That means that your body starts to heal itself less effectively.

GHK-Cu

Benefits of GHK-Cu

Luckily, you can now get supplements of this copper peptide. GHK-Cu injections are common, but so are creams and gels.

Researchers have conducted a ton of research on GHK-Cu in vitro (meaning in a petri dish with a bunch of cells), in animal studies, and in studies with humans [3, 4, 5, 6]. Over the 40 years since it was discovered, scientists have found that it has a ton of benefits.


The main benefits center around tissue healing, regeneration, and anti-aging. It’s basically the wolverine peptide. Some of its healing effects include:

  1. Skin repair, wrinkle reduction, and anti-aging effects [4]

  2. Hair growth [1]

  3. Antibacterial effects and infection reduction [5]

  4. Tissue remodeling [7]

  5. Repairing wounds [1]

  6. Lung and gut tissue healing [1]

  7. Anti-tumor and cancer suppression [1]

  8. Nerve regeneration [6]

It also seems to have a few psychological effects as well, including:

  1. Anti-pain effects [3]
  2. Anti-anxiety effects [3]
  3. Anti-aggression effects [3]

GHK-Cu Dosage Guide | What You MUST Know

While the research has shown that GHK-Cu peptide can be really effective, it hasn’t been super clear on what GHK-Cu dosage is the most effective. We’ve rigorously scanned the literature and this is the best dosing guidance that is currently available.

Injections

GHK-Cu dosage amounts: GHK-Cu works systemically, which means you can inject it anywhere in the body, either subcutaneously (under the skin) or intramuscularly (into the muscle) and it will have an effect throughout the body—not just where you inject it.

In the research, there are a number of doses that have been used.

  • Some found that a daily dose of 1.1 milligrams (mg) / kg of body weight is effective for healing [8]. That’s 77 mg for a 70kg person.

  • Others have suggested that a daily dose of 100-200 mg would also produce healing effects, but you would probably see effects at a much lower dose, too [1].

  • It’s not yet clear what an effective minimum dose is [9].

While GHK-Cu is generally recognized as safe [3], it can lower blood pressure [8]. So you should be careful not to take too much. Researchers suggest that a lethal GHK-Cu dose is very, very high—about 23,000 mg for a 70kg person—so it’s unlikely that you’ll accidentally take a lethal dose [8].

Still, even though it’s likely safe at relatively high doses, we haven’t seen research suggesting doses larger than 200 mg [1]. We consider that to be the highest safe dose unless further research provides more specific instructions.


GHK-Cu dosing cycle:
Some fitness experts have suggested the following GHK-Cu cycle [10], and it’s the one we recommend as well.

  • GHK-Cu dosing: 1.5 mg each day of the cycle, via subcutaneous or intramuscular injections.

  • Frequency: 1 per day. Or, several injections a day with partial doses.

  • Duration: 5-10 days.

  • Cycle: repeat once a year.

You’ll notice that this recommendation is for a very low dosage of GHK-Cu—only 1.5 mg. Start low and increase or adjust based on your experience of how it affects your body.

As always, you should consult with a physician before taking any supplements or substances.

Topicals

Another option is to use GHK-Cu creams and topical ointments. These are very effective for wound healing, repairing damaged skin, reducing signs of aging, and for stimulating hair growth.

GHK-Cu dosage amounts: For creams, researchers typically recommend using them as needed. There do not seem to be any side-effects of topicals—they have been found to be non-toxic and non-irritating [1]. Apply to the affected areas as required.

In studies, researchers usually apply GHK-Cu creams or gels once or twice a day [4, 11].

GHK-Cu For Beginners

The best advice for starting GHK-Cu as a beginner is to start slow and build up.

GHK-Cu is generally regarded as safe by the research community. Loren Pickart and his colleagues, one of the leading experts on the use of copper peptides, has said, “no issues have ever arisen during its use as a skin cosmetic or in human wound healing studies” [1]. So you should feel confident that GHK-CU is both effective and safe.

But, as with any supplement, you want to get a sense of how it affects your body before you take too much. That requires some self-experimentation. In general, start with a low dose and see how it affects your body. If you’re seeing results, great, stay with that.

If you’re not seeing results right away, wait a little bit. Take a few weeks off, and then try another cycle at a higher dose. Everyone’s body is different so you might notice results right away, or they may be more subtle.

Also, your age may play a role. Younger individuals naturally have more GHK in their system already. So adding some more may not make as big a difference for younger people. If you’re older, you may be more likely to start seeing a difference right away.

GHK-Cu For Healing

The healing effects of GHK-Cu peptide are incredible.

It’s been shown to drastically decrease the time it takes for skin tissue to repair itself. For example, in mice, GHK-Cu was found to increase the healing rate after a burn by 33% [12]. Not only does it seem to repair tissue, but it’s also anti-bacterial and anti-fungal, which is probably why it has been found to help prevent wound infections [13].

This is especially useful in individuals with compromised immune systems. For example, one study found that GHK-Cu helped people with diabetes more effectively recover from wounds. The study found GHK-Cu resulted in a 40% improvement in ulcer closures and a 27% reduction in infections compared to a control group [5]. Similar results were found in individuals with ischemic open wounds [14]

Other studies have found that it can help to protect and repair lung tissue [1], gut tissue, and even prevent cancerous tissue [9, 15].

GHK-Cu For Muscle Growth

There’s a huge potential for GHK-Cu bodybuilding.

To be clear, GHK-Cu muscle growth is uncertain. It is not marketed as a muscle growth supplement, and no research seems to have yet looked at the effect of GHK-Cu on muscle growth. So we don’t know if it has a direct effect on increasing muscle mass or speeding up muscle growth.


But what we do know is that some of the effects of GHK-Cu would be helpful in the muscle growth process.


Muscle growth happens when your body repairs itself

Muscle growth occurs through hypertrophy [16]. When you work out at high levels of resistance or weight, you challenge your muscles. The challenge damages and tears the muscle fibers. In response, your body repairs and replaces those muscle fibers, fusing them together and adding new ones. The fibers that are already there get thicker, and some new ones are added [16].

The important thing to note is that your muscles don’t grow in the gym, they grow when you rest—when your body repairs itself.

GHK-Cu helps repair tissue


Since GHK-Cu is central to your body’s ability to repair itself, it could be useful in supporting muscle growth.

For example, we know GHK-Cu is angiogenic, which means it helps to create new blood vessels and arteries [12]. It increases blood flow. Since adequate blood flow is necessary for the proper function and growth of muscle, this is one way that GHK-Cu can support muscle growth.

Another way is by keeping healthy the DNA that directs the building of muscles. GHK-Cu has been found to repair damaged DNA and resets it to a healthier state [1]. Creating healthier DNA could lead to better muscle growth.

Finally, it seems to speed up tissue repair in general. Since repairing muscle tissue is what leads to muscle growth, this speedy repairing effect could lead to faster muscle growth.

 

There is not yet research on copper peptides for muscle growth

 

Again, there has not yet been research on this. We are speculating. But, what we do know suggests that GHK-Cu could be useful in supporting bodybuilders. The effects it has—repairing tissue, preventing pain, repairing DNA, increasing blood flow, and generally removing aging effects—are all things that could help bodybuilders.

If you’re serious about growing muscle, try GHK for bodybuilding. At worst, you’ll only recover from injuries faster and develop great skin.

GHK-Cu

Where to Buy GHK-Cu Online? | 2020 Guide

Think it could be right for you? Give it a shot. You’ll want injections for the systemic healing effects as well as for hair growth and skin improvements. Creams are great for healing wounds, hair growth, and skin improvement at particular spots.

GHK-Cu isn’t easily available in stores, but it’s easy to find online. Peptide Sciences offers very high quality, research-grade products for GHK-Cu injections.

We love them for a number of reasons.

  1. They’ve got great customer service. You actually get to talk to a human being if you have a problem.

  2. You can order anywhere in the world. They’re based in the US, so shipping within the US is quick–only about 2-3 days. Shipping internationally is a little longer, but still convenient. You get your product within a week and a half.

  3. We love that you can pay with cryptocurrencies in addition to all the big credit cards. That makes it super convenient.
If you’re looking for GHK-Cu creams and topicals, try Aseir Custom. They’re a team of scientists and skin experts and have created a product that feels great and really achieves anti-aging results. They also have international shipping, convenient payments, and a decent return policy.

GHK-Cu ​For Bodybuilding | Verdict

GHK-CU may not be a miracle peptide, but it’s close. Unlike most other supplements, the effects of GHK-Cu injections are backed up by a ton of high-quality research [1]. They all find consistent results: copper peptides increase healing speed, help improve the quality and look of skin, and create tremendous hair growth.

We all naturally have GHK in our bodies, but it declines with age. That’s part of the reason our bodies bounce back from injuries so easily when we’re young, but not as quickly as you get older. Getting GHK-Cu supplements will help your body return to your former self.

While they haven’t been tested for muscle growth, the known effects make GHK-Cu for bodybuilding a great choice. It’ll help bodybuilders and athletes with injury recovery, healing, pain, and the DNA damage that occurs with age.

The stuff is rejuvenating. If you’re into bodybuilding give it a try. If you find it doesn’t do anything for muscle growth, at least you’ll have great skin and hair.

Buy GHK-Cu from our #1 recommended vendor...

References

  1. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2014). GHK and DNA: resetting the human genome to health. BioMed Research International, 151479. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/151479

  2. Pickart, L., Thayer, L., & Thaler, M. M. (1973). A synthetic tripeptide which increases survival of normal liver cells, and stimulates growth in hepatoma cells. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 54(2), 562-566.

  3. Pickart, L., & Margolina, A. (2018). Regenerative and protective actions of the GHK-Cu peptide in the light of the new gene data. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(7), 1987.

  4. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2015). GHK peptide as a natural modulator of multiple cellular pathways in skin regeneration. BioMed Research International, 648108. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/648108

  5. Mulder, G. D., Patt, L. M., Sanders, L., Rosenstock, J., Altman, M. I., Hanley, M. E., & Duncan, G. W. (1994). Enhanced healing of ulcers in patients with diabetes by topical treatment with glycyl‐l‐histidyl‐l‐lysine copper. Wound Repair and Regeneration, 2(4), 259-269.

  6. Ahmed, M. R., Basha, S. H., Gopinath, D., Muthusamy, R., & Jayakumar, R. (2005). Initial upregulation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators during nerve regeneration in the presence of cell adhesive peptide‐incorporated collagen tubes. Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System, 10(1), 17-30.

  7. Pickart, L. (2008). The human tri-peptide GHK and tissue remodeling. Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition, 19(8), 969-988.

  8. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2012). The human tripeptide GHK-Cu in prevention of oxidative stress and degenerative conditions of aging: implications for cognitive health. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2012. Doi: 10.1155/2012/324832

  9. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2017). The effect of the human peptide GHK on gene expression relevant to nervous system function and cognitive decline. Brain Sciences, 7(2), 20.

  10. Ben Green Fitness (n.d.). The Little-Known Russian Wonder Compound & The Fringe Future Of Anti-Aging Medicine. https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/article/anti-aging-articles/how-to-use-peptides/

  11. Abdulghani, A. A., Sherr, A., Shirin, S., Solodkina, G., Tapia, E. M., Wolf, B., & Gottlieb, A. B. (1998). Effects of topical creams containing vitamin C, a copper-binding peptide cream and melatonin compared with tretinoin on the ultrastructure of normal skin-A pilot clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural study. Disease Management and Clinical Outcomes, 4(1), 136-141.

  12. Wang, X., Liu, B., Xu, Q., Sun, H., Shi, M., Wang, D., … & Feng, B. (2017). GHK‐Cu‐liposomes accelerate scald wound healing in mice by promoting cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Wound Repair and Regeneration, 25(2), 270-278.

  13. Kukowska, M., Kukowska-Kaszuba, M., & Dzierzbicka, K. (2015). In vitro studies of antimicrobial activity of Gly-His-Lys conjugates as potential and promising candidates for therapeutics in skin and tissue infections. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 25(3), 542-546.

  14. Canapp Jr, S. O., Farese, J. P., Schultz, G. S., Gowda, S., Ishak, A. M., Swaim, S. F., … & Martin, F. G. (2003). The effect of topical tripeptide‐copper complex on healing of ischemic open wounds. Veterinary Surgery, 32(6), 515-523.

  15. Siméon, A., Wegrowski, Y., Bontemps, Y., & Maquart, F. X. (2000). Expression of glycosaminoglycans and small proteoglycans in wounds: modulation by the tripeptide–copper complex glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine-Cu2+. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 115(6), 962-968.

  16. Leonard, J. (2020, January 8). How to build muscle with exercise. Medical News Today. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319151

References

  1. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2014). GHK and DNA: resetting the human genome to health. BioMed Research International, 151479. https://doi.org/10.1155/
    2014/151479

     

  2. Pickart, L., Thayer, L., & Thaler, M. M. (1973). A synthetic tripeptide which increases survival of normal liver cells, and stimulates growth in hepatoma cells. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 54(2), 562-566.

     

  3. Pickart, L., & Margolina, A. (2018). Regenerative and protective actions of the GHK-Cu peptide in the light of the new gene data. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(7), 1987.

     

  4. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2015). GHK peptide as a natural modulator of multiple cellular pathways in skin regeneration. BioMed Research International, 648108. https://doi.org/10.115
    5/2015/648108

     

  5. Mulder, G. D., Patt, L. M., Sanders, L., Rosenstock, J., Altman, M. I., Hanley, M. E., & Duncan, G. W. (1994). Enhanced healing of ulcers in patients with diabetes by topical treatment with glycyl‐l‐histidyl‐l‐lysine copper. Wound Repair and Regeneration, 2(4), 259-269.

     

  6. Ahmed, M. R., Basha, S. H., Gopinath, D., Muthusamy, R., & Jayakumar, R. (2005). Initial upregulation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators during nerve regeneration in the presence of cell adhesive peptide‐incorporated collagen tubes. Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System, 10(1), 17-30.

     

  7. Pickart, L. (2008). The human tri-peptide GHK and tissue remodeling. Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition, 19(8), 969-988.

     

  8. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2012). The human tripeptide GHK-Cu in prevention of oxidative stress and degenerative conditions of aging: implications for cognitive health. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2012. Doi: 10.1155/2012/324832

     

  9. Pickart, L., Vasquez-Soltero, J. M., & Margolina, A. (2017). The effect of the human peptide GHK on gene expression relevant to nervous system function and cognitive decline. Brain Sciences, 7(2), 20.

     

  10. Ben Green Fitness (n.d.). The Little-Known Russian Wonder Compound & The Fringe Future Of Anti-Aging Medicine. https://bengreenfieldfitn
    ess.com/article/anti-aging-articles/how-to-use-peptides/

     

  11. Abdulghani, A. A., Sherr, A., Shirin, S., Solodkina, G., Tapia, E. M., Wolf, B., & Gottlieb, A. B. (1998). Effects of topical creams containing vitamin C, a copper-binding peptide cream and melatonin compared with tretinoin on the ultrastructure of normal skin-A pilot clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural study. Disease Management and Clinical Outcomes, 4(1), 136-141.

  12. Wang, X., Liu, B., Xu, Q., Sun, H., Shi, M., Wang, D., … & Feng, B. (2017). GHK‐Cu‐liposomes accelerate scald wound healing in mice by promoting cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Wound Repair and Regeneration, 25(2), 270-278.

  13. Kukowska, M., Kukowska-Kaszuba, M., & Dzierzbicka, K. (2015). In vitro studies of antimicrobial activity of Gly-His-Lys conjugates as potential and promising candidates for therapeutics in skin and tissue infections. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 25(3), 542-546.

  14. Canapp Jr, S. O., Farese, J. P., Schultz, G. S., Gowda, S., Ishak, A. M., Swaim, S. F., … & Martin, F. G. (2003). The effect of topical tripeptide‐copper complex on healing of ischemic open wounds. Veterinary Surgery, 32(6), 515-523.

  15. Siméon, A., Wegrowski, Y., Bontemps, Y., & Maquart, F. X. (2000). Expression of glycosaminoglycans and small proteoglycans in wounds: modulation by the tripeptide–copper complex glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine-Cu2+. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 115(6), 962-968.

  16. Leonard, J. (2020, January 8). How to build muscle with exercise. Medical News Today. https://www.medicalnew
    stoday.com/articles/319151

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